How do I check which IP my domain is pointing to? Print

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Windows 

On Windows, press the Windows Key + R to open the run dialog. Type in cmd and then press enter. A command prompt window will open. Type in: nslookup yourdomain.com (replace yourdomain.com with your domain) and press enter. As an example, nslookup voxvm.com

You will get a reply like the following:

Server: UnKnown
Address: 10.200.1.10

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: voxvm.com
Address: 1.2.3.4

The top section where it says server and address is the DNS server your computer is using. The section that says "Non-authoritative answer" is the IP address your DNS server is providing.

macOS & Linux

macOS and Linux include a useful utility called DIG. Open Terminal and type in dig yourdomain.com (replace yourdomain.com with your actual domain) and press enter. As an example, dig voxvm.com

You will get a reply like the following:

; <<>> DiG 9.11.4-P2-RedHat-9.11.4-26.P2.el7_9.8 <<>> voxvm.com
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 55593
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 2, AUTHORITY: 2, ADDITIONAL: 13

;; OPT PSEUDOSECTION:
; EDNS: version: 0, flags:; udp: 4096
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;voxvm.com. IN A

;; ANSWER SECTION:
voxvm.com. 192 IN A 1.2.3.4

[Rest of output truncated]

The section you want to look at is the ANSWER SECTION. This is the IP address your DNS server is providing.

DNS Overrides

A common issue we see is when a client forgets they used their system's host file to override DNS. If you see the IP you're expecting but not your site, check your system's host file.

Windows

On Windows, this file is located at C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\ and is called "hosts" (without a file extension). It is just a plain-text file. To modify it, you need to open Notepad as Administrator. 

macOS and Linux

On these systems, the file is located at /etc/ and is called "hosts" (without a file extension). It's just a plain-text file. To modify it, you will need to open nano as root (use sudo).


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